(Source: lanarey, via queerpuke)

husssel:

Alternative music video for “Grown Woman” (x)

YASSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!

my favorite, wish it had made it to the album. both vids are SO EXCELLENT. 

(Source: adoringbeyonce, via cariga)

Sky Ferreira - Love in Stereo

A good (anti)-Valentine’s Day song.

(Source: Spotify)

theremixbaby:

internet poptimism and i broke up and i got all the records.

there’s something, i dunno, weird to me about this current “TEEN GIRLS ARE SACRED AND WE MUST LISTEN TO EVERYTHING THEY SAY” meme, occassionally invoked by popcrit types. i know it originates from a good place, and so i don’t mind it as a corrective to the monstrous disdain for young women’s opinions our society undeniably has, but too often these ideas, idk, misrepresent actual real life teen girls who are still kind of immature and figuring out who they are, etc etc. i guess my real issue here is when “stop being awful to [young] women” turns into “teen girls have the best taste in everything!” especially when this idea is invoked by men in their 30s. because it is so often divorced from real life teenage girl’s experiences and opinions, because it is only applicable when teen girls like something that we want them to like, because most of those teen girls will grow up into women with completely different tastes who you will not care about. because most ‘teen pop’ is actually consumed BY CHILDREN, NOT TEENS.because I bet there are as many (probably more) american high school girls who listen to Drake than listen to fucking One Direction but that doesn’t fit the poptimist narrative so nobody ever talks about the fact that his fanbase skews young & female (nodisrespectozaynmalik, alldisrespecttodudesontheinternet). because when I was a teen girl my favorite bands were The Cure and Modest Mouse and I hated every non-rap song on the radio and I would have kicked out your poptimist teeth if you’d suggested that Britney Spears was “my” music. because i was wrong about pop music and i needed time to grow up and figure shit out just like anyone else. i was not a fully formed oracle of pop culture wisdom, i was a kid.

the idea that poptimism is somehow inherently more feminist literally disgustsme, as a woman and as a music fan. there are about 50,000 reasons why pop music is great, but the fact that some folks perceive pop music to be better because it’s more ‘feminine’ or it’s ‘what women like’ or some shit like that is downright insulting to me. we all know rockism was rooted in chauvinistic ideas, but that doesn’t mean the polar-opposite perspective is immediately feminist. if anything, when poptimism tries to get political, when poptimists (dudes usually) make this argument that liking pop is somehow more progressive than liking male-dominated forms like rock, it mostly only serves to reinforce stereotypes about women, that we are frivolous and shallow and inauthentic and obsessed with spectacle over meaning. this whitewashes the fact that women have been fighting for equal space in less commercial, more masculine genres of music for decades. it posits that pop music has better gender parity for both performer and audience than a lot of other genres because women chose pop, when in reality we were just banned from every other clubhouse.

i realized a couple weeks ago that a lot of self-described feminist men on the internet are a lot more interested in elevating femininity than they are in the welfare of real life actual women. the denigration of femininity is a crucial part of sexism, but it’s not the only or even the most important part. and selfishly using the literal oppression of women to argue why you think a record is or isn’t great is gross and unhelpful. i haven’t got a problem with women explaining why they think a record is sexist or exploring how those themes affect their enjoyment of said record—that shit is awesome and important, even when i disagree with it. but sometimes I feel that for a lot of men these ideas (“but the women [don’t] like it! here’s a link to one woman’s blog I read once!”) are simply another weapon in the arsenal to use against other dudes when arguing on blogs and forums and twitter. idk, maybe i am being too cynical here, but liking pop music (or hating dudebro indie rock) doesn’t make you a feminist. To suggest that it does is a disservice to both women and pop. YOU MFS WILL NEVER BE MORE FEMINIST THAN ME AND I OWN ‘LIFE IS… TOO $HORT’ ON CD.

"i realized a couple weeks ago that a lot of self-described feminist men on the internet are a lot more interested in elevating femininity than they are in the welfare of real life actual women." For sure, and how troubling is it to see the trappings of the "teenage female experience" lauded as great art/great music by people who, in a lot of ways, have no meaningful interaction with teen girls? Like, I’m not saying that older male music bloggers should have a bunch of teen girl friends to validate their interest in pop music or whatever, but isn’t there something a touch gross and insidious about people creeping on the teen girl experience via cultural products and talking about how culturally pure and authentic it is? Spoiler alert - for a lot of people, being a teen girl fucking sucked and was denigrating and horrifying and really brutally upsetting & it just kind of feels gross to hear dudes who never lived through that experience to talk about how teen girls are taste makers and artistic national treasures or whatever.

It’s been awhile since I was a teen girl, but I didn’t forget what it feels like to be ignored and heckled and talked over and told that what I liked didn’t matter and who I was didn’t matter… because when you’re a teen girl you grow into an adult woman and realize, “Oh, this is just going to keep happening forever in various areas of my life,” unless randos on the internet are fetishizing you for liking something they think you’re supposed to like anyway, which just means you’re fulfilling their stereotypical ideal of teen girlhood (or adult womanhood) which is, spoiler alert #2, still sexist.

Idk, I’m probably just going to delete this anyway because who on earth wants to invite further conversation on sexism and music blogging. NOT ME.

"i guess my real issue here is when “stop being awful to [young] women” turns into “teen girls have the best taste in everything!” especially when this idea is invoked by men in their 30s. because it is so often divorced from real life teenage girl’s experiences and opinions, because it is only applicable when teen girls like something that we want them to like, because most of those teen girls will grow up into women with completely different tastes who you will not care about.”

i have not been keeping up with poptimism but the above two pieces capture a lot of what bothers me about Rookie and the like—being a teen girl was NOT COOL for me and it is really hard to watch everyone clamor all over themselves about ideas of being a teen girl that feel so divorced from any reality i knew (like, most of those cool teen girl pieces are not written by teen girls but by women in their 20s and 30s who are holding on to an idea of what they wish being a teen girl had been for them and at some point i wanna say IT IS OK! IT IS NOT A GREAT THING TO BE  A TEEN GIRL IN OUR WORLD AS IT EXISTS maybe we should address like, institutional sexism instead of focusing on bandaids like consuming flower headbands or doc martins or whatever is supposed to make teenage girlhood feel better). but also i am probably just a h8r.

heavenrants:

Angel Haze’s cover of Drunk in Love

(via queerandpresentdanger)

britneyjustin:

britsanity:



Witnesses say they asked Britney why she shaved her head and her response was, “I’m tired of plugging things into it. I’m tired of people touching me.”



T-Pain: “That was the most beautiful thing in the world. Do you know why she was shaving her head? Because it was so important to other people. She is like, “Listen. Don’t touch my hair anymore. Stop touching my hair.” People were like, “We’ve got to make your hair before you go outside. You can’t leave.” She went … “Now I don’t have hair. What you going to do?”

Our Diva Britney Jean Spears
BODILY AUTONOMY

britneyjustin:

britsanity:

Witnesses say they asked Britney why she shaved her head and her response was, “I’m tired of plugging things into it. I’m tired of people touching me.”

T-Pain: “That was the most beautiful thing in the world. Do you know why she was shaving her head? Because it was so important to other people. She is like, “Listen. Don’t touch my hair anymore. Stop touching my hair.” People were like, “We’ve got to make your hair before you go outside. You can’t leave.” She went … “Now I don’t have hair. What you going to do?”

Our Diva Britney Jean Spears

BODILY AUTONOMY

(via illhaveuknowthatiloveyou)

Our Diva Prince Rogers Nelson

Our Diva Prince Rogers Nelson

(Source: kruma, via illhaveuknowthatiloveyou)

illhaveuknowthatiloveyou:

Fiona Apple in the Nov ‘97 issue of Spin magazine

ahahahaha

Our Diva Fiona Apple

(Source: vintagesalt)

rookiemag:

Closing Time

A final farewell to 285 Kent, my favorite DIY venue. Words by Amy Rose, photos by Olivia.


tw: sexual harassment
I’ve been trying to ignore the inevitable “285 is closing RIP DIY” / “285 is closing, good riddance because they sold out” posts because honestly brooklyn wants to believe itself to be important but we’re not, it’s fine, the internet, etc. But oh geeze, this farewell piece talking about that place like it was a family, like it was some warm environment, like these are universally true statements, excuse me but that is the place where some white dude and his friends kept grabbing my ass and ignoring my death glares each time I turned around, where they avoided my gaze so I could never quite tell who knew who or who did what, where I rehearsed “FUCK YOU I WILL FUCK YOU UP SO BADLY TRY IT TRY IT AGAIN THEY WILL HAVE TO DRAG ME OUT OF HERE I DARE YOU” speeches until my friend came back from the bathroom and the dudes let up because another man was around to monitor them or some garbage (not to mention a place where I never felt comfortable using the bathroom because what was the deal, were the doors half glass? never bothered to find out, did not feel safe to me), where I regularly kept my hands on my hips because that puts elbows at the exact angle needed to maintain space/jab people who get too close. Of course I am sorry to see a DIY-ish space go, I know a lot of people worked hard and cared about it a lot. But at the same time let’s not glorify this particular space which was so dominated by men and the privileges that a DIY scene can amplify.
“When I go to a show at an independent club or bar, I want to be at least a little afraid of being donkey-kicked in the face by a crowd surfer, blinded by flying whiskey flung into the crowd by a surly performer, or abandoned for eons with some band’s T-shirts and CDs after agreeing to watch the merch table while its rightful guardian uses the bathroom.”
Some people (like the woman in the OP) def want that kind of environment, but even reading about it seems so cliche, so boring to me. I have definitely felt adrenaline or endorphins or some sense of freedom while in a pit. I get it. But so many of those details feel like they’re relics, symbols of what punk is supposed to be according to archival footage seen on MTV. If we’re going to reminisce, first I wanna say fuck riot grrrl’s white cis girls only attitude, then I wanna ask: can’t we at least hold on to the idea that a woman should be able to be in the front without having her ass grabbed, a person should be able to go to a show without being donkey kicked, without having someone throw a drink in their face? That certain kinds of violence are alienating and frankly often more about someone being able to instagram it or talk about the bruises later? Don’t sober kids get to be in on the fun? It seems that so much is about cred instead of experience, who you know instead of music. How fucked up you got (without actually experiencing long-term harm of course). The scene.
The most attractive parts of DIY/punk for me are the parts where people try to look out for one another, not the parts where we enact some kind of “anarchy means being an asshole without question” mentality. Clearly this scene was not the scene for me and some other women had ok experiences there, and I guess I want them to be able to look at those experiences rosily, but it is sure frustrating to hear this glorious eulogy of a place so full of camaraderie when that camaraderie did little when it really came down to keeping many of us safe, that camaraderie was built from the privileged position of being able to step in and out of violent situations for fun, that camaraderie heavily excluded so many people.
285 is gone and when I heard I wasn’t too sad about it. I was there from the beginning, I sweated it out when they lacked a/c, I remember when they tried renaming it Babycastles, I saw some of the so-called sellout shows, too. I would go because I wanted to see an act, not because it was happening at 285. After my discomfort and seeming paranoia were validated via having my ass grabbed it really took a lot of convincing to get me to go to a show there. In some ways I’m relieved that something new will start up, that other venues will pick up the slack. The Brooklyn DIY scene wants to have a rad aesthetic without rad politics and that’s so fucking dull. If we’re going to keep trying to relive the past, keep trying to grab on to some idealized version of DIY and punk, can we at least carry some semblance of rad politics with, too?
I’m so bored of the white feminism responses I anticipate already, of the “if you can’t handle it don’t go” attitudes, of the “well it was a really great time for ME” oversimplified, individualistic approaches to these so-called community spaces. We know the world primarily through our own experiences, sure. One of the beauties of community is that it asks us to understand the world by expanding outside ourselves, by sharing, connecting, witnessing or experiencing something together. Maybe for some that’s having a lit sparkler flying through a crowd and getting a thrill, but I don’t think that’s the pinnacle of this kind of experience. It is so much more interesting to share things you love and struggle with, things that are complicated and nuanced and dynamic and hard. You can love 285 but also know it was not perfect.
There is something very satisfying to me, saying “Rest in Peace,” wishing a quiet afterlife, a settling and stillness, to a place that some want to hold in their imaginations as raucous and free. Get in that coffin, 285. Take the individualist politics with you. How wonderful to have this opportunity to bury the things we know we should leave behind.

rookiemag:

Closing Time

A final farewell to 285 Kent, my favorite DIY venue. Words by Amy Rose, photos by Olivia.

tw: sexual harassment

I’ve been trying to ignore the inevitable “285 is closing RIP DIY” / “285 is closing, good riddance because they sold out” posts because honestly brooklyn wants to believe itself to be important but we’re not, it’s fine, the internet, etc. But oh geeze, this farewell piece talking about that place like it was a family, like it was some warm environment, like these are universally true statements, excuse me but that is the place where some white dude and his friends kept grabbing my ass and ignoring my death glares each time I turned around, where they avoided my gaze so I could never quite tell who knew who or who did what, where I rehearsed “FUCK YOU I WILL FUCK YOU UP SO BADLY TRY IT TRY IT AGAIN THEY WILL HAVE TO DRAG ME OUT OF HERE I DARE YOU” speeches until my friend came back from the bathroom and the dudes let up because another man was around to monitor them or some garbage (not to mention a place where I never felt comfortable using the bathroom because what was the deal, were the doors half glass? never bothered to find out, did not feel safe to me), where I regularly kept my hands on my hips because that puts elbows at the exact angle needed to maintain space/jab people who get too close. Of course I am sorry to see a DIY-ish space go, I know a lot of people worked hard and cared about it a lot. But at the same time let’s not glorify this particular space which was so dominated by men and the privileges that a DIY scene can amplify.

When I go to a show at an independent club or bar, I want to be at least a little afraid of being donkey-kicked in the face by a crowd surfer, blinded by flying whiskey flung into the crowd by a surly performer, or abandoned for eons with some band’s T-shirts and CDs after agreeing to watch the merch table while its rightful guardian uses the bathroom.”

Some people (like the woman in the OP) def want that kind of environment, but even reading about it seems so cliche, so boring to me. I have definitely felt adrenaline or endorphins or some sense of freedom while in a pit. I get it. But so many of those details feel like they’re relics, symbols of what punk is supposed to be according to archival footage seen on MTV. If we’re going to reminisce, first I wanna say fuck riot grrrl’s white cis girls only attitude, then I wanna ask: can’t we at least hold on to the idea that a woman should be able to be in the front without having her ass grabbed, a person should be able to go to a show without being donkey kicked, without having someone throw a drink in their face? That certain kinds of violence are alienating and frankly often more about someone being able to instagram it or talk about the bruises later? Don’t sober kids get to be in on the fun? It seems that so much is about cred instead of experience, who you know instead of music. How fucked up you got (without actually experiencing long-term harm of course). The scene.

The most attractive parts of DIY/punk for me are the parts where people try to look out for one another, not the parts where we enact some kind of “anarchy means being an asshole without question” mentality. Clearly this scene was not the scene for me and some other women had ok experiences there, and I guess I want them to be able to look at those experiences rosily, but it is sure frustrating to hear this glorious eulogy of a place so full of camaraderie when that camaraderie did little when it really came down to keeping many of us safe, that camaraderie was built from the privileged position of being able to step in and out of violent situations for fun, that camaraderie heavily excluded so many people.

285 is gone and when I heard I wasn’t too sad about it. I was there from the beginning, I sweated it out when they lacked a/c, I remember when they tried renaming it Babycastles, I saw some of the so-called sellout shows, too. I would go because I wanted to see an act, not because it was happening at 285. After my discomfort and seeming paranoia were validated via having my ass grabbed it really took a lot of convincing to get me to go to a show there. In some ways I’m relieved that something new will start up, that other venues will pick up the slack. The Brooklyn DIY scene wants to have a rad aesthetic without rad politics and that’s so fucking dull. If we’re going to keep trying to relive the past, keep trying to grab on to some idealized version of DIY and punk, can we at least carry some semblance of rad politics with, too?

I’m so bored of the white feminism responses I anticipate already, of the “if you can’t handle it don’t go” attitudes, of the “well it was a really great time for ME” oversimplified, individualistic approaches to these so-called community spaces. We know the world primarily through our own experiences, sure. One of the beauties of community is that it asks us to understand the world by expanding outside ourselves, by sharing, connecting, witnessing or experiencing something together. Maybe for some that’s having a lit sparkler flying through a crowd and getting a thrill, but I don’t think that’s the pinnacle of this kind of experience. It is so much more interesting to share things you love and struggle with, things that are complicated and nuanced and dynamic and hard. You can love 285 but also know it was not perfect.

There is something very satisfying to me, saying “Rest in Peace,” wishing a quiet afterlife, a settling and stillness, to a place that some want to hold in their imaginations as raucous and free. Get in that coffin, 285. Take the individualist politics with you. How wonderful to have this opportunity to bury the things we know we should leave behind.

Shopping - You Are A Sort (Don’t Call Me)

for fans of: the Raincoats, Shop Assistants, Ponytail, 90s brit stuff that was kinda post-punk and kinda twee (but this is from 2013), hollering and shimmying (the activities, i don’t believe there is a band named hollering and shimmying although i am now reserving that name pls and thank you)